5 Unique Stones You Didn't Know Existed

5 Unique Stones You Didn't Know Existed

5 Unique Stones You Didn't Know Existed

You're probably familiar with the glow of a moonstone and the sparkle of a diamond, but have you gazed upon the beauty of a sodalite? We love opals and moonstones as much as you do, but we think it’s time for us to diversify our gemstone collection and invite more color into our lives.

It’s safe to assume you’re all looking for a little something to brighten up your days right now, look no further, we’re excited to bring some color your way. During these uncertain times, we're more than happy to be a constant source of positivity and of course anything sparkly. Today we're sharing five unique stones you didn't know existed. You might be unfamiliar with these beautiful stones, but they'll soon become your go tos.

1. London Blue Topaz

Yes, the perfect color does exist and the London Blue Topaz is proof of that. This gorgeous stone reflects various shades of blues, and greens depending on the angle. Trust us it looks spectacular from every angle!

 

2. Rhodolite

The Rhodolite gets its beautiful name from the Greek word rhodon, which translates to rose-like. This gorgeous stone is in the garnet family, however, it stands out because of its varying shades of pink, violet, and rose.

3. Sodalite

Leave it up to designer Carrie Elizabeth to introduce us to another exquisite gemstone. For the spiritual folks, the rare Sodalite is believed to have healing energies which cleanse your aura and remove bad feelings. Thanks Carrie!

4. Ametrine

You're probably thinking we're just making things up now. We would never, we care about you too much to lie to you! The uncommon Ametrine is a mixture of two dazzling gems, amethyst, and citrine. In this enchanting stone, you'll see yellows, oranges, and purples.

5. Tanzanite

You might think you're looking at an Amethyst, but this is actually a Tanzanite. This sublime stone can only be found in a small mining area in Tanzania(psss...this is where it gets its name). Fun fact, the violet-hued tanzanite wasn't discovered until the 1960s.